Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Shortbread Traditions

Revisiting an old, but popular post I made 6 years ago.

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Monday, December 11, 2006


When I was growing up my mother always made Shortbread using the family recipe, handed down by her mother. It was shortbread the way it "should" be, three simple ingredients, butter, berry sugar, and flour. I believed in that recipe. I defended it as the best shortbread there was. Until I got married.

My husband grew up knowing shortbread from a different recipe, the one from the "Canada Cornstarch" box. We each thought "our" shortbread was the best. The good natured argument went on for a bit until one Christmas early in our marriage I decided to have a side by side "taste test". I made both recipes and we voted for our favorite. We both liked the cornstarch recipe the best so from that point on it was the one I used, except for one important modification. I made it larger. The recipe on the box only makes 2 dozen. Are they serious? That wouldn't last one evening around this house! Besides I kind of liked the way my grandmother's recipe used up the whole pound of butter.

So here's my adaptation of the cornstarch recipe. I've "super-sized" it so that it takes a whole pound of butter and makes about 5 dozen cookies and I've also simplified the mixing method.

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Using an electric mixer, cream together one pound of (room temperature) butter, 1 1/3 cups of icing sugar and 1 1/3 cups of corn starch. Gradually add 3 cups of flour. Turn out onto a lightly floured board/countertop and knead until well blended. Roll out 1/4 inch thick and cut with cookie cutters. Place on an ungreased cookie sheet and bake at 300 degrees F. for 15 - 20 minutes until just the outside edges are lightly browned. Cool on a wire rack.
The recipe itself has not been my only break with tradition. My mom used a medium sized cookie cutter with a wavy edge (like the cookies on the left). When I got married I could not find the same kind of cookie cutter and had to substitute the flower-ish shape on the right. For years I searched for a cookie cutter like my mom's so that I could have shortbread the way it "should" be. Finally last year I found one. In the meantime my own children have grown up with shortbread made with the flower-ish cutter --- the ones on the right.

A few days ago my married daughter mentioned that she had made a batch of shortbread. She was complaining that it didn't look the way it "should". You see, she can't find a cookie cutter with "bumps" like mine. All she has is a cookie cutter with a wavy edge. Bwahaha! Bumpy or wavy, there is one thing we both agree on: Shortbread must have three rows of fork pricks to look "right". Left plain they look naked, or blind, or somethin'.

I guess traditions are whatever you get used to.

Incidentally, my mother eventually abandoned her mother's recipe and made whipped shortbread each year.

Shortbread Traditions

4 comments:

kristo said...

There DOES have to be bumps on the cookies....lol.
(then you nibble off the bumps first, then eat the middle)
Seriously though Mom, if you ever find another cookie cutter with those flower bumps, let me know. ;)

Marlene said...

LOL, but by the time I do your own kids will be so used the ones with the serrated edges that they will be disappointed when you switch from their traditional shortbread to the silly ones with "bumps". ;-)

Tanya said...

Been lurking for awhile.... Canadian living in WA state. I tried your shortbread recipe with a group of girls tonight and they were EXCELLENT! Of course I had to call home for mum's sugar cookie recipe.... Thanks for sharing!

Marlene said...

I'm glad you enjoyed making them with the girls Tanya. Maybe the activity will become a tradition with the group?